How blockchain can change the music industry

Matéria de TechCrunch

Since the 1999 launch of Napster's music-sharing platform, the music industry has been in near-constant turmoil, with dipping revenues, lack of transparency,..

” Since the 1999 launch of Napster’s music-sharing platform, the music industry has been in near-constant turmoil, its timeline marked with dipping revenues, lack of transparency, piracy problems and feuds over the fair distribution of dividends.

Music companies hate streaming services. Streaming services hate file-sharing services. And, most of all, artists and content creators hate virtually everyone else for making huge sums off their toil and feeding them the crumbs.

[…] At its core, the blockchain is a distributed ledger that can validate and register transactions without the need for a central authority. No one owns the ledger — it’s spread across the nodes that constitute its network and is publicly available to everyone

[…] In the music industry, the blockchain could transform publishing, monetization and the relationship of artists with their communities of fans”

[…] a transparent system would generate much more revenue and create more opportunities”

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US elections: Music industry executives outline their copyright wish list

Music Week brings you the latest publishing news from across the industry.

” The US elections will take place on November 8, 2016. On that day, US citizens will not only elect a new President of the United States but also renew Congress, as a total of 34 Senate seats (out of 100) and all 435 House of Representatives seats are up for election.

Music Week asked music industry professionals two questions: 1) What would be the three main copyright-related issues that you’d like to see fixed by the next President/Congress? And 2) And what is the likelihood that these issues will indeed be fixed during the next four years? Here are their answers”

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The Musical Twitter Bot and Copyright for AI-Facilitated Works

Tweet to the Twitter bot, “LnH: The Band”—a newcomer in artificial intelligence music generation—and the bot will automatically compose melodies for you.

“Tweet nicely to the Twitter bot, “LnH: The Band”—a newcomer in artificial intelligence music generation—and the bot will automatically compose melodies for you. The AI-based band is “currently working on their first album,” according to LnH Music, but who will own the rights and royalties to the album? Or what aboutMubert, which is touted by its creators as the world’s first online music composer, and which “continuously produces music in real-time … based on the laws of musical theory, mathematics and creative experience?” In other words, if a computer program generates a creative work—be it a song, book or other creation—is there a copyright to be owned? If so, who owns and gets to collect on the copyright?”

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FUGA launching new US operation as it signs Tommy Boy deal –

New York office soon to open as 7digital exec comes on board

“The agreement will see FUGA handling catalog from artists including Afrika Bambaata, Ghostface Killah, Naughty by Nature and Method Man.

Pieter van Rijn, CEO, FUGA added: “We’re excited about Tommy Boy joining our tight knit family and honoured to be working with Tom, Rosie and their exceptional team.

“Demand for FUGA’s technology and distribution services has guided our decision to set up a dedicated Americas hub, in the capable hands of one of our directors, Dave Driessen. Anna Siegel has fantastic experience and knowledge of the American market, and will be a great asset to that end.”

Tom Silverman, Founder, Tommy Boy added: “It is increasingly important for independent record labels to remain competitive in this period of industry adjustment. FUGA is an important part of the operational setup Tommy Boy has developed to foster artist and catalogue growth.”

Benson Curb, Curb Records concluded: “We’re thrilled with FUGA’s technology platform and services and are very happy about their increased American presence”

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An Indie Artist Makes 4X More from Streaming Than a Major Label Artist

Matéria de Digital Music News

How much more money can you make off of streaming music by skipping a major label? A new research report attempts to answer that question.

“Perhaps the number one question we get from artists is the following: ‘what do streaming services actually pay?’ At first, we had no idea, and none of the streaming services would tell us.

Then, we started asking artists to send us their streaming statements. Since that point, we’ve gone through scores of streaming statements and millions of streams, trying to answer that question. Most of the time, the statements were provided confidentially by the artists or labels themselves, and never from streaming services or major labels.”

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Warner Music Group’s ADA to Take Over Entertainment One Physical Distribution – Los Angeles Independent News

Aqui no Brasil temos o mesmo movimento. Fui informada recentemente que Warner e Sony estão fazendo a distribuição física com a mesma empresa. A estimativa é que o digital represente 80% da receita até o final deste ano.

Aqui no Brasil temos o mesmo movimento. Fui informada recentemente que Warner e Sony estão fazendo a distribuição física com a mesma empresa. A estimativa é que o digital represente 80% da receita até o final deste ano.

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